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Funeral Plans which include repatriation to the Philippines

Discussion in 'Life in the UK' started by CatchFriday, Aug 23, 2023.

  1. CatchFriday
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    CatchFriday British Expat living in Alicante, Spain

    In 2005 I met through my work as a district nurse (now retired), a Filipino Lady who had an extremely small pension of I think £61 a week. She lived in Fulham, and I assisted her in obtaining pension credit, and referred her to Sheltered Accommodation. She has happily lived in Part 3 accommodation ever since. In 2020 I assisted in part for her to have Attendance Allowance and she has now received a back payment,

    I have now suggested that she get a Funeral Plan and she has a plot in a cemetery in Leyte. She is a Catholic.

    Although I am looking at TCS Worldwide Repatriations Service, can anyone here recommend a better service. In the case of this lady my help in this matter is for free. So it is of the utmost importance that as she is a vulnerable adult that her best interests are paramount.
  2. bigmac
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    bigmac Well-Known Member Trusted Member

    wouldnt a local cremation and send a bag of ashes home be a lot simpler and cheaper ?
  3. CatchFriday
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    CatchFriday British Expat living in Alicante, Spain

    In this case the lady is a Roman Catholic and she has the belief that her body should arrive in the Philippines for the Wake etc....
  4. oss
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    oss Somewhere Staff Member

    It can cost £8000 or a lot lot more that's a ballpark on a search that agrees with searches I've made on this topic in years gone by, I think the choice of carrier is going to heavily influence the price but it's quite specialist and likely to cost a lot from any company.

    Does she actually have a plot, some actual ground, or is it one of those slots in a concrete wall where they place the rendered down bones of the body?
  5. John Surrey
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    John Surrey Well-Known Member

    It would @bigmac much simpler like that.

    When Filipino die they really do like to give them a good send off:

    Catholics, generally hold a wake known as lamay or paglalamay, a vigil that typically lasts for three to seven nights[5][7] and may last longer if the bereaved family is waiting for a relative traveling from afar. During this time, the cleaned and embalmed[6] corpse is placed in a coffin and displayed at the house of deceased[5] or a funeral home.[7] The coffin is traditionally surrounded by funeral lights, a guest registry book, a contribution box, and flowers.[8] Family members, relatives, and acquaintances participate in the vigil.

    Apart from offering condolences, mourners and visitors provide financial donations (abuloy) to help assuage the funeral and burial expenses. Food and drinks are customarily served by the bereaved during the night vigil,[7] and typical activities conducted outside or near the vigil area include engaging in conversation, singing, guitar playing,[9][better source needed] and gambling – such as playing card games[6] – to keep mourners awake.[6][8][better source needed]

    On the funeral day, the coffin is generally loaded into a hearse or borne by family members, relatives, or friends in procession towards the church and later the cemetery.[5] Other mourners follow the hearse during the funeral march. Catholic funerals involve the celebration of the Mass, while Protestant funerals include singing of hymns and recitation of prayers by a minister.[8]


    We live almost next door to a small Chapel here... so it goes on quite a lot - all night too - generally not too noisy.

    The other thing is they like to be buried or laid next to each other so there's generally a family plot and they stack them one on top of the other unless you're rich in which case you'd buy a whole lot for your family etc.

    This actually affects me, I'd like to be buried next to my wife but I'm not Catholic so unless I sought that out they won't let me.
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  6. bigmac
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    bigmac Well-Known Member Trusted Member

    well--in the hopefully unlikely case that my wife does pop hers before i do--i wont be posted a corpse to the other side of the world.
    • Like Like x 2
  7. CatchFriday
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    CatchFriday British Expat living in Alicante, Spain

    First quote:

    Professional services to include; Zinc Kendal Coffin, removal of the deceased from a London mortuary to our chapels of rest, tropical embalming, washing and dressing of the deceased, use of the chapels of rest, all documentation and transport to the airport £ 1,820.00

    Free From Infection Certificate £ 40.00 Flight Cost to Manila with Emirates (coffin) *
    1 – subject to confirmation £ 1,360.00 Embassy Charges and Administration £ 250.00 Total £ 3,470.00

    Raniel Funeral Home (Optional) Arranging customs and clearance, payment of handling charges to the airport. Transfer from Manila Airport by plane to Tacloban City airport and by land to Hindang, Leyte £ 1,750.00
  8. CatchFriday
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    CatchFriday British Expat living in Alicante, Spain

    She has a plot set aside for her, as I understand. The importance for the Filipino family is uppermost, the place of remembrance, when every year the family gather around the departed ones.....
  9. CatchFriday
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    CatchFriday British Expat living in Alicante, Spain

    I actually pay €40 a month do that in the event of either I or my wife dying, or both of us at the same time, the cremation is paid for and the service - I have told my wife that i would like my ashes thrown into the sea!
  10. CatchFriday
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    CatchFriday British Expat living in Alicante, Spain

    Aside from all this, I once went to a hindu burial - It was a doctor I had worked for and I was considered family, i was invited into the inner room where we danced around and placed ghee on the corpse. He was all dressed up in flowers, then the next day we went to the London Crematorium where all the pretty work we had done was burned along with the doctor who had died. After the ceremony i learnt that his ashes were being taken to the
    The Ganges: India’s River of Life and Death .......

    ....
  11. Jim
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    Jim Well-Known Member Trusted Member

    My funeral plan...
    Place my body on a trike pay the driver extra peso for his trouble( only 2 kilometers ) St Peters Funeral services.
    Arrange my dead body to be cremated ( make sure the metal plate and pins that hold my leg together are removed) could help to pay for cremation!
    Told my wife, whatever she wants to do with my ashes.
  12. bigmac
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    bigmac Well-Known Member Trusted Member

    this business of ashes really grinds my gears.

    What happens if the body is buried ? Does someone chop a thumb off and give it to the next of kin?

    Whos ashes are they anyway ? Or did a crem worker empty out a vacuum cleaner ?

    Arent photos of happier times enough ?
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  13. Jim
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    Jim Well-Known Member Trusted Member

    Not sure who you are referring too, I don't give two hoots what happens to me when I die.
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  14. bigmac
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    bigmac Well-Known Member Trusted Member

    not referring to anyone--just saying what i think of the whole business--for thats exactly what it is--funerals.
  15. CatchFriday
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    CatchFriday British Expat living in Alicante, Spain

    Ok the lady that i am helping has settled for a cremation, between £795 - £1000 and catholic service £199. The price of the quote she found rather expensive.
    • Informative Informative x 1
  16. bigmac
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    bigmac Well-Known Member Trusted Member

    Is that plus VAT?
  17. John Surrey
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    John Surrey Well-Known Member

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