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A Universe From Nothing by Lawrence Krauss (2009)

Discussion in 'General Chit Chat' started by aposhark, Feb 12, 2020.

  1. aposhark
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    aposhark Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

  2. oss
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    oss Not Here Staff Member

    Yep I like him.

    Will watch later.

    Me, I never had a problem with appearing from nothing ;) :D

    I always thought that it was a neat trick, ever since I was about 13 or 14 years old.

    Our experience of life goes from nothing to something to nothing, and every one of us is nearly 14 billion years old, the gestation period was a bit long but then again we were all born in the same event and none of us will really die for 10 to the power of millions (in years) probably, when eventually the last black hole evaporates but by then the piece of space that contained that black hole will be so incredibly isolated from any other part of space as to be a micro universe in its own right.

    I could go on but it would get seriously complicated, much easier to explain the idea in person rather than by typing on a forum :)

    And also that is only one possibility, that one is the slow death, the big rip is much more fascinating, it ends this adventure much quicker just maybe 20 billion more years :D
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2020
  3. aposhark
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    aposhark Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    This one is also good, Jim.
    It is similar.

    The accelerating Universe: Nobel Laureate Brian Schmidt.

  4. oss
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    oss Not Here Staff Member

    That's probably the big rip, will look at that one later as well.
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  5. JohnAsh
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    JohnAsh Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    Lately I am finding that most people’s concept of the distant past goes back to the various ice ages (I think global warming has put that “on the map” in peoples minds) but going back much further is so rare. I find that this sort of stuff has helped me anchor down events going back through the 4.6 billion years and beyond. This idea that we are all made of stuff from 14 billion years back helps me to complete the jigsaw in my mind.
  6. aposhark
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    aposhark Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    We took the kids to see the following movie in 3D at the "Sir Patrick Moore Planetarium" at the National Space Centre in Leicester:
    We all enjoyed it a lot and my son has loved all things to do with Space since that day.
    This one is in 2D though.
  7. oss
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    oss Not Here Staff Member

    I first learned of the possible topologies of the Universe in the early 1970s, flat, spherical and saddle, I never imagined that it would be saddle I was convinced that it had to be spherical but these guys have pretty much proved that it isn't.

    Absolutely wonderful, what a fantastic surprise, it helps imply that maybe there is much more than we can see in this universe, it possibly implies a multiverse.

    Life is wonderful and to be alive now when people can do work like this is amazing.

    An excellent video Mike a great find, I knew most of it already but I liked this guy's straightforward presentation.

    This is the big rip, I find that version of reality to be utterly fascinating.

    edit: I wrote the last sentence before his comments on the Big Rip, but he likes the idea and so do I :D
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2020
  8. oss
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    oss Not Here Staff Member

    It always comes back to scale, most of us including me have trouble retaining more than four things in our minds at any one moment but as humans we can actually process concepts that represent realities that are utterly vast, we just have to do it a little bit at a time.

    I was talking to my daughter Janna today and she gets bored with history, I was too when I was her age, she told me she fell asleep in class and her teacher took a video of her as she woke her up :)

    I hated history when I was a kid but I loved science and without realising it I loved history, just a different scale of history.

    The odd thing is that now as my years advance I am actually very interested in human history in our tiny bit of the history of the universe, strange and I wish I had been more interested in human history when I was younger.
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2020
  9. oss
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    oss Not Here Staff Member

    Standard Candles :D

    That was a very good talk, not seen that one before from Krauss, again I knew all this but I liked this presentation.
  10. JohnAsh
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    JohnAsh Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    Yes, well I was a bit like that. I thought it was because of the history teacher. But maybe not. I do have more of an interest now in conventional history than I used to.
  11. JohnAsh
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    JohnAsh Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    Ah yes, the Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester had display etc on the Sun last year which we visited.

    69969F04-C072-43A1-9CBD-310BFB4A3EE8.jpeg
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  12. aposhark
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    aposhark Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    It's going to be great in early 2022 when the Solar Orbiter is sending back images of the big current bun :D

    Solar Orbiter - Artist's Impression. (From the European Space Agency (ESA) website.)

    [​IMG]
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