1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Article 50

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion and Ethics' started by Markham, Jan 26, 2017.

  1. Markham
    Offline

    Markham . Lifetime Member

    This morning the government published a short two clause Bill seeking Parliament's approval to trigger Article 50:

    [​IMG]

    According to Guido Fawkes, the Bill's timetable is equally short:
    • Second Reading and debate on Tuesday 31 Janusary and Wednesday 1 February with the Second Reading vote taking place also on the Wednesday;
    • Committee and report stages as well as the Third Reading on Monday 6 to Wednesday 8 February;
    • Thence to House of Lords
    • Like Like x 2
  2. Markham
    Offline

    Markham . Lifetime Member

    Ken Clarke is the only Tory MP who will vote against this Bill as all the other committed Remainers on the Tory benches - including
    Nikki Morgan and Anna Soubry - have indicated that they will support their government and not defy the electorate's instruction.

    Corbyn began the week by saying that he would not use a "three line whip" to force his MPs to vote in favour of the Bill but would merely ask them to do so, recognising that many - including himself - represented Remain-voting constituencies. But he has today stated that his MPs will be subject to three line whips. This change presents some problems for both him and his front bench team:
    • Tulip Siddiq said, before today's announcement, that she would resign from the front bench if three line whips are imposed;
    • Cat Smith and Jo Stevens are also likely to resign their posts;
    • Clive Lewis, Dawn Butler, Catherine West, Daniel Zeichner and Thangam Debboniare will all vote against which would leave Corbyn with little option other than to sack them.
    Unless either Corbyn or his front bench rebels back down, he may be forced into another reshuffle - his third!

    The SNP's 56 MPs along with the nine Lib Dems and one Green will all vote against the Bill. That could cause constituency problems for one Lib Dem'er, Tom Brake, whose Carshalton and Wallington constituency voted to leave.

    The Bill will almost certainly become law in time for Mrs May's self-imposed deadline of the end of March.
  3. Timmers
    Offline

    Timmers Well-Known Member Trusted Member

    Ken Clarke, been a thorn in the side for quite a while now, I expect a lot in his party will be glad to see the back of him.

    Labour are in an understandable mess with a lot of their seats voting to leave the EU, the party cannot appease all its supporters, I feel for JC on that score, he is in between a rock and a hard place as they say.
  4. Bootsonground
    Offline

    Bootsonground Well-Known Member

    Yeah but once it`s triggered Britain still has to wait another 2 years!!
    Groan!!!!

    [​IMG]
  5. Markham
    Offline

    Markham . Lifetime Member

    Not necessarily. Britain could exit at any stage before the two years is up but that's rather unlikely.
  6. Timmers
    Offline

    Timmers Well-Known Member Trusted Member

    I sight for sore eyes :)
  7. Markham
    Offline

    Markham . Lifetime Member

    Labour support for the EU is relatively recent and is a Blairite New Labour phenomenon.
  8. Bootsonground
    Offline

    Bootsonground Well-Known Member


    I wonder how May can have a productive meeting re: trade deals with Trump when Britain has to wait 2 more bloody years?
  9. Timmers
    Offline

    Timmers Well-Known Member Trusted Member

    Wasn't it in the press that a deal between the UK and US could be signed as early as three months after we exit the EU?

    Just champion if that's the case :)
  10. Bootsonground
    Offline

    Bootsonground Well-Known Member


    Do you mean three months after we trigger article 50 or 3 months after we exit the EU in 2 years time??
    This is all very confusing!!
  11. Timmers
    Offline

    Timmers Well-Known Member Trusted Member

    After the two years is up, that was the idea being discussed on the news at weekend, whether it will come off I do not know but it makes for good news on the Brexit side of things.
  12. CampelloChris
    Offline

    CampelloChris Well-Known Member

    I would imagine it will need to be after we leave. Until then Britain is bound to continue to act as an EU member state
  13. Markham
    Offline

    Markham . Lifetime Member

    No trade deal can be signed and have the force of law until Britain exists the EU. However, in the interim, there can be unofficial, ad-hoc talks between Britain and other countries on trade-related matters. The Prime Minister has suggested that before Brexit, certain barriers could be reduced on both sides of the Atlantic.

    Let's face it, the Americans wanted to finalise TTIP because it would open our public services - here and elsewhere in Europe - to American companies with the big risk of privatisation of the Health Service and it ceasing to be free at the point of delivery. Be wary of Scottish Americans bearing gifts!
  14. Timmers
    Offline

    Timmers Well-Known Member Trusted Member



    Lets hope that the UK comes up with some good trade negotiators pretty soon, any deals regarding privatisation of the health service would have to be a big no no.

    The NHS is sacred to us, and it should remain that way.
  15. Dave_E
    Online

    Dave_E Well-Known Member Trusted Member

    The US Viewpoint:
    http://www.bbc.com/news/business-38749884
  16. Timmers
    Offline

    Timmers Well-Known Member Trusted Member

  17. Markham
    Offline

    Markham . Lifetime Member

    New Zealand has some very experienced, tough and competent trade negotiators which their Prime Minister has offered to lend to Britain, should be need them.
  18. Markham
    Offline

    Markham . Lifetime Member

    Oh dear. The Lib Dem Parliamentary candidate for Lewes, Kelly-Marie Blundell, has compared the government's Article 50 Withdrawal Bill to Hitler's 1933 Enabling Act:

    [​IMG]
    Had Ms Blundell done her homework before posting her tweet, she would have discovered that the Enabling Act gave Hitler almost unlimited powers to make arbitrary law and was an integral step leading towards his reign of terror. Our government's Bill, on the other hand, exercises parliament’s sovereignty to fulfil the will of the people and leave the European Union.

    Some Lib Dems seem to have a nasty penchant for comparing our government to the Nazis. Here's a tweet from one of its MEPs:

    [​IMG]
  19. Markham
    Offline

    Markham . Lifetime Member

    I watched part of the Second Reading debate broadcast on BBC Parliament yesterday afternoon and was struck by some of the venomous invective spouted by some of those MPs who will vote against the Bill. One of those is (of course) Nick Clegg who told the House "I have a great sense of foreboding" and then claimed to be speaking up for "young people" to which opponents noted that he had been quick to impose college fees on those same youngsters (even though his party's Manifesto clearly stated no to tuition fees). Clegg regurgitated the old chestnut that voters didn't know what they were voting for - adding that leaving the Single Market and leaving the Customs Union were not explicitly stated on the Ballot Paper. That salvo was effectively neutered by a reminder that not only did the principal campaigners from both Remain and Leave explicitly stated those inclusions in their speeches and interviews but it was also stated clearly in the £9 million booklet delivered to all addresses in the UK ahead of polling day. (Edit to add) To their eternal shame, Nick Clegg was the only member of his party present for most of yesterday's debate, a point rather forcefully made at today's PMQs.

    Michael Gove noted "It is a tragedy that the party which is called Liberal Democrat is scarcely liberal and now anti-democratic."

    Ken Clarke, the only Tory who will be voting against his party, repeated his attack line that something as important as Britain's membership of the EU was far too important to be decided by a plebiscite and the result should be discounted - his is an attitude so typical of the liberal elite that used to govern our country.

    Anna Soubry, a former minister in Cameron's government, made several barbed interjections during the speeches by members of her own party yet remained silent during those of pro-Leave MPs from other parties.

    The best performance by a country mile was the twelve word speech made by Julian Lewis: "In my opinion the people have decided. I’m going to vote accordingly."
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2017
  20. Timmers
    Offline

    Timmers Well-Known Member Trusted Member

    I felt for Ken Clarke, he tried his best to get his point across but I'm afraid he is a dinosaur and is a voice in the wilderness.

    I enjoyed honest Clegg getting a kicking, that always amuses me :)

    Clegg is so thick skinned though, even for a politician.

Share This Page